Butterfly

In this lesson, Charlie presents the 11 bars of a classical piece called The Butterfly

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In case you missed it ...

Today we look at a little classical piece called The Butterfly. It has a consistent right hand picking pattern pretty much through the 11 bars of the piece, and I'm going to take you through it, one bar at a time, both left and right hand.

So starting off with bar number one, we've got our second finger here on an A note and the first finger on the C note. So I then pick with my right hand:
thumb, first, second, first, third, first, second, first, ....

The important thing here is to make sure that you establish that right hand picking pattern because it is going to be fairly predominant through the entire piece ... just repeat it a few times ... will take a while to get that going, so be persistent with it and then we'll move on to the next finger picking pattern.

Ok, taking a look at the second part of bar one on the left hand. I'm going to put my second finger here on an A note which is on the G string third (oops, second!) fret, and I'm going to play my A bass first off ...
followed by the A note ...
second finger on a B bass ...
also back to the A note ...
third finger on a C bass ...
back to the A note again ...
and finishing on the A bass to the A ...

First section ...

So here is the right hand to the second part of bar one ... notice how I'm alternating my first finger and my second finger. Playing with my thumb first off... first finger on the higher A... thumb... second finger on the higher A... first finger ...

So, bar two, I just start shaping a D minor chord. I've my first finger on an F, my second finger on an A, and my third finger on a D, and my right hand pattern remains exactly the same except for the fact that I'm now playing a D bass note ...

Now the second part of bar number two, we are just simply keeping our finger on that A note, and this time I'm moving my bass notes on the D string, so I'm playing my D bass, followed by my A ... my E, followed by my A ... and my F followed by my A ...

Now the right hand for bar two ...

Let's just put bar one and two together...

The notes that we have in bar three are E and G# and we play the B and the open E, doing the same right hand pattern as we did pretty much for bar one and bar two ...

Second part of bar two (oops three!), we're starting with G and E# ... then our F and G# ... makes it E and G# ... and then open D and G# ...

Right hand pattern for the second part of bar two (ahem, three!) ... thumb first ... thumb second ... thumb first ... thumb second ...

In bar four, we've got and A minor chord with a C bass. I've got my second finger sitting here on a an A, my first finger on a C, and my third finger down here on my C bass. And the right hand is pretty much the same as the previous bars ...

And for the second part of the fourth bar, we're really just playing what is essentially an E7 chord, so I've just got my second finger here on a B and I've for a G# with my first finger, and my forth finger, my pinkie, is down here on a D, on the third fret of the B string ...

Taking you through so far, nice and slow ...

Now, the good news is bars five and six are exactly the same as bars one and two ...

So all the way through to bar six ...

So, our next shape is going to be an A minor chord, and we're going to be playing the E note on the D string second fret with our thumb, that's going to be our bass note ... here is my right hand ...

Now for the second part of bar seven, all I do is add that E bass note that second time around on the bottom ... nothing else changes ...

And the first half of bar eight, I return back to my high E on the bass ...

For the second part of bar eight, all I'm doing is removing the C note and ending up with what is essentially an Asus2, and my right hand remains exactly the same, so I have my E bass, my high E bass with my second finger ... I then follow that up with my first finger here on a G# on left hand and an E bass, right hand remains the same ...

So bar eight ...

Through bars seven and eight ...

Ok, bar nine is made up of pretty much three shapes with our left hand. We've got A, C and of course our open E note, and our A bass note on the top, so we're going to arpeggio that through thumb, first, second, third ...

Ok the second shape, I'm playing the notes G# and D on the top with my fourth finger, and my open E, and I'm playing an E bass to start. So I've got E bass, G#, D, open E. Right hand is thumb, first, second, third ... shape one ... shape two ...

Right hand for both of those shapes ... just arpeggio-ing through, A bass on the first one, first, second, third ... and E bass on the second one, first, second, third ... I'm then going back to my first shape ... and for the final shape, I don't play the D on the top, I play a open B string, so I have the notes G#, open B and E...

So looking at the left hand, bar nine ...

Bar ten, is just a repeat of bar nine ...

So playing through both of those bars nine and ten ...

And we finish off simply with an A bass and a A note picking with our first finger ...

So let me just take you through it, one bar at a time, very very slowly, showing you the left hand and right hand.
Bar one ... Bar two ... Bar three ... Bar four ...
Bar five ...Bar six ... Bar seven ... Bar eight ...
Bar nine ... Bar ten ... Bar eleven ...

Well, I hope you've enjoyed playing through this nice little classical piece. Most important that you establish your right hand on each bar individually, and then put the whole thing together. Take your time, be persistent. It's worth the trouble. Talk to you soon!

Copyright © C. Pennell & J. Marco (cpguitar.com)